Eating Disorders, Compulsions & Addictions

The new EDCAS program for 2020-2021, FALSE BODIES, FALSE SELVES, is now accepting applications. This course will accept online and in-person participants.

A copy of the complete program’s brochure can be found here.

 

register today

(Information on Hungers & Compulsions, taught in 2018-2019, can be found here)

 

EDCAS 2020-2021


FALSE BODIES, FALSE SELVES: CONTEMPORARY RELATIONAL PERSPECTIVES ON EATING DISORDERS, COMPULSIONS & ADDICTIONS


People who struggle with eating disorders, addictions, or compulsions manage their feelings about

themselves through managing their bodies. Their bodies are rarely experienced as natural

extensions of self, with reliable internal cues that can be respected and responded to. Rather, bodies

become the enemy, there to be punished. They are to be manipulated, their states altered, not

trusted. These bodies express pain and longings that cannot be integrated and experienced as true.

Unintegrated, unsymbolized parts of the self are often sequestered in symptoms expressed through

the  body, in action, not words. The patient living in the false body, an extension of the false self,

cuts off authentic experience to self and others. In this world, compliance substitutes for connection.

Drawing on contemporary psychoanalytic theory, we explore the ways in which such patients can

risk giving up their closed relationships with the concrete world of food, drugs, and objects and open

themselves to the potentials of mutuality, relatedness, and authenticity.

 

THE  PROGRAM


The EDCAS program is a 35 week comprehensive course of study. The program focuses on integrating principles of interpersonal psychoanalysis with other treatment modalities.  Theory and clinical casework are explored in the areas of eating disorders and disordered eating issues, body image, affect regulation, addiction to substances, relationships, exercise, and internet use. The curriculum combines 36 classes of didactic and clinical seminars, guest lectures, case conferences, individual and/or group supervision, and an off-site cooking and networking event.  Its aim is to provide a concentrated, practice-oriented educational experience to mental health professionals who want to use the interpersonal perspective in working with people who have eating disorders, compulsions, or addictions.  Each participant will be assigned a mentor who will be available for consultation and support throughout the program. Individual and group supervisory consultation are optional for licensed program participants and offered in the private offices of the program faculty for a period of 20 weeks for a reduced fee of $65 per session for individual and $45 for group. This is a separate fee from program tuition. Participants are invited to attend the EDCAS Clinical Service meetings.

 

ADMISSIONS

 

Preference will be given to licensed mental health professionals practicing psychotherapy, either privately or in institutional settings. Therapists possessing a different educational background or professional experience may also apply. Participants are required to carry malpractice insurance and to provide their own psychotherapy patients for supervision.

 

All faculty and supervisors are graduates of the William Alanson White Institute, with the exception of guest speakers from other analytic institutes or disciplines.


All classes will integrate clinical case material. Case material by participants will be encouraged. ALL CLASSES WILL BE HELD ON FRIDAY’S from 2:00-4:00pm at THE WILLIAM ALANSON WHITE INSTITUTE, 20 WEST 74th St., NYC.  Classes will begin on September 25th, 2020.

 

TUITION


The Program tuition is $3850 and is non-refundable after the first three weeks of the start of the program. Should a participant choose to withdraw within the first three weeks, a penalty fee of $250 will be incurred.  Early application is encouraged. Continuing Education credits for physicians, psychologists, social workers, licensed psychoanalysts, Licensed Mental Health Counselors and Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists are provided. Application deadline is September 1st, 2020 and admissions are on a rolling basis of acceptance as space is limited.

 

This program is approved for 70 Continuing Education Contact Hours, (CE, CME credits) for Psychologists, Physicians, and Social Workers. Credits are calculated on a credit per hour basis.

 


 

 

SCHEDULE

 

WEEK 1    FRIDAY EVENING EVENT   6:00 - 8:00pm    September 25th, 2020

Wine & Cheese Reception

INTRODUCTION: INTERPERSONAL PERSPECTIVES ON EATING DISORDERS, COMPULSIONS & ADDICTIONS.

  • Welcome by Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D., Director and Co-Founder of EDCAS, Supervising Analyst

  • Training & Supervising Analyst, William Alanson White Institute --------The Interpersonal Perspective in Clinical Treatment

  • Orientation: Meet and greet participants and faculty

 

EATING DISORDERS


WEEKS 2 & 3 October 2nd and October 9th 2:00-4:00

EATING DISORDERS:  CLINICAL APPLICATIONS UTILIZING THE INTERFACE OF CONCEPTS OF ATTACHMENT, SELF REGULATION, AFFECT REGULATION, NEUROBIOLOGY AND THE ANALYTIC RELATIONSHIP

Course Instructor: Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D.

Using clinical case material, this course will present a detailed, practical exploration of how one works analytically with anorexic, bulimic, and binge-eating patients beyond symptom alleviation.  Understanding the neurobiological underpinnings and the implications of these findings in clinical treatment, the concepts of attachment theory, self regulation and affect regulation will be viewed as interpersonal constructs. The need for novelty will be illustrated in clinical moments where the relational field shifts. The ongoing exploration of interactions between patient and therapist, the many “bodies” in the room, why a particular intervention is chosen, as well as transferential and countertransferential concerns will be discussed. Issues of the often neglected work with male eating disordered patients, body obsession, diagnosis, assessing the level of care, and techniques involving contracts, food charts, and food language as metaphor, will be viewed as part of the bridge one builds to enter the ritual-filled world of the eating disordered patient.


WEEK 4 October 16th

GIRLS!  DEVELOPMENTAL CHALLENGES FROM PUBERTY TO ADOLESCENCE

Course Instructor: Jacqueline Ferraro, D.M.H.

This class will focus on puberty and developmental issues in girls, taking into account efforts to develop an identity and sense of self as girls move through this critical period in their lives.  The transition through puberty into adolescence involves significant changes in their physiology, body image, and cognition, with accompanying social and emotional elements. Coping with all of these changes can involve efforts to control weight (restricting and/or bingeing), cutting, drug and alcohol use, and sexual experimentation and activity. Relevant vignettes will be incorporated into class discussion.



WEEKS 5 & 6     October 23rd and October 30th

EATING DISORDERS: THE INTERPERSONAL TREATMENT OF THE INDIVIDUAL AND THE FAMILY

Course Instructor: Judith Brisman, Ph.D.

This class will present an interpersonal approach to the treatment of anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder, with a particular focus on the role of the family in the treatment of children, adolescents and young adults. Because of the complexity of eating-disordered patients’ dynamics and the urgency of life-debilitating symptoms, treatment often involves extension of the boundaries of traditional analytic work -- both with the individual and the family. An approach is offered in which direct symptom intervention occurs within the framework of an interpersonally-based analytic approach. Work with the family in that regard will be considered, contrasting it to the evolving family-based treatment models in which direct re-feeding by parents is urged. When is direct re-feeding helpful?  When does it hurt?   Questions regarding treatment choice will be explored and discussed. Complications, roadblocks, and treatment goals will be considered in developing an understanding of how best to reach these often unreachable patients.



WEEK 7 November 6th

TACKLING OBESITY: PRACTICAL ADAPTATIONS, INTERPERSONAL TECHNIQUES

Course Instructor: Janet Tintner, Psy.D.

High recidivism rates and the frequency of redo bariatric surgeries highlight intractability in this arena.  Meta analysis of research indicates short term weight loss is achievable.  It is long-term maintenance that is crucial, but elusive.  We must adapt to tackle this thorny issue.  This course deals with this question practically, in a review of bariatric surgical options.    Surgery is viewed as a tool (not a solution) in working with despair and intransigence in treating obesity.   Psychological concerns, pre and post surgery,  will be described.  Clinically, this course demonstrates the use and import of the detailed inquiry as a means to facilitate awareness of eating in the here and now, as well as a means to demonstrate enactments of childhood experiences in current patterns.


WEEK 8 November 13th

BINGEING

Course Instructor: Stephanie Roth Goldberg, LCSW

This class will explore the range of bingeing experiences, those that are part of a bulimia diagnosis and precede purging, those that follow a period of food restriction or anorexia, and bingeing that is part of Binge Eating Disorder.  We will look at one’s embodied or disembodied experiences during the binges and connect that behavior to the range of emotional experiences one has with the aim of providing a psychoanalytic lens for the treatment of bingeing.

 

WEEK 9 November 20th

‘EVERY BITE YOU TAKE’: THE SCIENCE OF FOOD

Course Instructor: Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D.

The brain in your gut exerts a powerful influence over your head. But the gut may have a physiological and psychological response that relates to the science of food itself. Why sugar and why salt? When you take a bite of food you experience the physical and chemical interaction in your mouth. Simultaneously, you are evaluating the sensation of food from the initial anticipation to the perception of its arrival on your palate to the first bite, chewing and swallowing. Your mouth ‘feels’ food. People eat mindfully and mindlessly as they hunger for connection, creativity, aliveness, peace and solace. When are cravings emotionally based and when are they confused with physical hunger and what does the science of food have to do with it? This class will explore how we recognize and demystify food myths; experientially practice mindful eating; understand the science of food; and use food discourse in creative embodiments of subjectivity.


WEEK 9 [EVENING] November 20th 6:00-9:30pm

LOCATION: The Institute of Culinary Education, 225 Liberty St., New York, NY

Each student will have the opportunity to participate in a networking and interactive dinner event hosted by the Institute of Culinary Education, from 6:00-9:30pm. This unique hands-on event involves cooking as the entertainment. The evening will begin with hors d’oeuvres or an antipasto platter, open bar of wine and soft drinks, and the glass will be split into groups to begin cooking. When finished, students are seated and served the meal that the group prepared….and of course…no one will leave hungry!


WEEK 10 December 4th

INVITED GUEST SPEAKERS  *EXTENDED TIME SESSION

THE ROLE OF THE NUTRITIONIST & MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

Moderator: Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D.

Guest Speakers will include Judy Schwartz, MD; Karen Rosewater, MD; Wendy S. Ziecheck, MD; Theresa Kinsella, MS, RD,; Robin Millet, MS, RD, CDN; Marina S. Kurian, MD, FACS

A multi-disciplinary approach to treatment involving the use of adjunct modalities will be examined in a roundtable discussion. Guest Speakers will include Nutritionists, Internists, Gynecologist and a Bariatric Surgeon.


WEEK 11 December 11th

EATING AND THE GENDERED SELF

Course Instructor: Sarah Schoen, Ph.D.

This course will consider how cultural, developmental, and psychological forces influence the relationship between eating and gendered identity. The focus will be on how feelings about eating and bodies are tied to a person’s experience of themselves as a man, or as a woman.  For people with eating problems, experiences of self as desiring and desirable are often played out in relationship to food and body size. Clinical material will be used to explore how both the patient’s and therapist’s gendered selves, including feelings about their bodies and appetites, shape and transform the interpersonal field.


WEEK 12 December 18th

BODY IMAGE

Course Instructor: Elizabeth Halsted, Ph.D.

This class will explore the deep and complex psychological elements constituting the

dynamic Body image. We will identify the vital functions produced by a stable body image

and the symptoms that arise from an unstable body image. Students and the instructor will

offer clinical material and formulate interventions that generate the creation of new and

more resilient body images.



2021


WEEK 13 January 8th

BRIDGING THEORY AND PRACTICE: CLINICAL CONUNDRUMS

Course Instructors: Sarah Schoen, Ph.D.; Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D. and members of the EDCAS Steering Committee

This course will use transference and countertransference data to bridge theoretical knowledge and clinical experience. Students will be encouraged to raise clinical dilemmas in an informal and spontaneous discussion. Themes in clinical material that integrate interpersonal and relational concepts in work with eating disordered patients will be highlighted.


WEEK 14 January 15th

EATING DISORDERS AND THE ORTHODOX JEWISH COMMUNITY: IT’S COMPLICATED

Course Instructors: Sharon Kofman, Ph.D. & Caryn Gorden, Psy.D.

This course will explore the increased incidence of eating disorders within the Orthodox Jewish population from a psychoanalytic perspective. Contemporary socio-cultural, historical, and religious factors that contribute to Jewish identity will be examined. The role of ritual and eating practices, family and gender dynamics, and cultural issues specific to the body, desire, and sexuality will be discussed. We will consider the role of unconscious historical influences, such as the legacy of persecution, genocide, and intergenerational transmission of trauma, as critically contributing to this symptom picture in survivor families. Discussion will involve noteworthy clinical features, treatment dilemmas and countertransference experiences.


WEEK 15 January 22nd

BLENDING CBT/DBT AND INTERPERSONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF EATING DISORDERS

Course Instructor: Carrie Gottlieb, Ph.D.

This course will examine the similarities and differences between cognitive behavioral and dialectical behavior therapies and interpersonal psychotherapy. The integration of these therapies will be explored as they pertain to treatment and conceptualization of individuals with eating disorders.  Discussion will focus on the blending of these approaches in treatment.


WEEK 16 January 29th

EMOTIONAL MODULATION

Course Instructor: Sandra Buechler, Ph.D.

Emotions are a primary means of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication. As clinicians and as human beings, how can we best hear and use their messages? How can we learn to modulate them, to bring out their potential to enhance life, rather than detract from it? These questions will be explored in this course, with an emphasis on their clinical applications and a focus on the emotional cues that form a vital part of the fabric of the treatment interchange, as well as the rest of human experience.


WEEK 17 February 5th

THE HORMONAL BODY AND ITS IMPACT ON THE PSYCHE
Course Instructor: Sue Kolod, Ph.D.

The impact of hormones on the psyche, of particular relevance to sexuality, appetite and self experience, has been largely avoided in contemporary psychoanalytic thought. Psychoanalytic treatment has focused on the ways in which the mind affects the body, i.e., how psychological conflict can be expressed through physical symptoms.  This class will explore how the body can affect the mind.  Research will be cited from evolutionary biology and endocrinology and case material will be used to demonstrate how an inquiry into hormonal experience can inform clinical work.

 

WEEK 18 February 12th

EATING DISORDERS IN THE CONFLUENCE OF RACIAL DIVERSITY AND CULTURAL PLURALISM

Course Instructors: Toni Andrews, Ph.D.; Rosa Lim, Ph.D.

Eating disorders are not just white, middle-class, heterosexual, cisgender and able-bodied, young girls’ illnesses. This class explores personal, political and clinical issues of race in eating disorder treatment including differences between the impact of oppression and assimilation stress on identity development, and culturally relevant treatment implications.



WEEK 19 February 19th

THE PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY OF EATING DISORDERS AND ADDICTIONS

Course Instructors: A. Mittsi Crossman, M.D. & Melanie Israelovitch, M.D.

The psychopharmacology of substance disorders, including those involving food, encompasses a complex interplay between biological, psychological, and sociological factors intrinsic to the disorders and to their treatments. This course will address the indications and contraindications for the application of a variety of psychopharmacological agents as a component of treatment. Participants will be encouraged to present questions from their own practices.


WEEK 20 February 26th

CASE PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION BY CANDIDATES

Course Instructors: Discussion by EDCAS Faculty members and class participants



COMPULSIONS


WEEK 21 March 5th

CULTIVATING CURIOSITY IN EXERCISE ADDICTION

Course Instructor: Anton Hart, Ph.D.

This course will present an overview of the concept of cultivating curiosity. It will address the ways in which addictive and compulsive symptoms can be seen as problematic ways of dealing with the difficulties of lived experience. Practical considerations for cultivating curiosity in patients with addictive and compulsive exercise and body-image symptoms will be presented.

 

WEEK 22 March 12th

INTERNET ADDICTION and the use of TECHNOLOGY MEDIATED COMPULSIVE RELATIONSHIPS

Course Instructor: Phillip Blumberg, Ph.D.

This class will situate on-line addictions within the broader context of sexual compulsions. Psychobiological and psychodynamic processes, including impairments in self-regulating systems, as well as separation-individuation conflicts which have been associated with on-line compulsions, will be reviewed. The class will examine the “virtual” nature of cyber sexuality--including chat rooms, interactive games, erotic e-mail, and web cams--and what it indicates about the changing nature of the contemporary American social character.

 

WEEK 23 March 19th

WHEN COMPULSIONS ARE SOLUTIONS: CYBERSEX AND INTERNET PORN

Course Instructor: Todd Essig, Ph.D.

This course will explore clinical examples in which seemingly compulsive technologically-mediated sexual activity is later understood to have served crucial developmental and transitional functions. A treatment strategy is presented in which both the gains and losses of technology-mediated sexual experiences are explored. Three general questions are addressed: How does it work that technology can successfully mediate relationship experience? How and when does such mediation fail? What are the important differences between technologically-mediated relationship experiences and those experiences that come from being bodies together?

 

WEEK 24 March 26th

SEXUAL ABUSE, COMPULSION, & DYSFUNCTION

Course Instructor:  Richard B. Gartner, Ph.D.

This course will explore how sexual abuse, sexual compulsivity, and sexual dysfunction are interrelated factors in understanding compulsive, "anorectic," and/or kinky sexual behavior. We will focus on clarifying and sorting through the potential meanings of patients' sexual expression. Additionally, we will look at treatments that either develop alternate sexual expression or help the patient feel more comfortable with sexual patterns that he or she perceives as shameful or abnormal.


ADDICTIONS


WEEK 25 April 9th

TREATING ADDICTIONS FROM AN INTERPERSONAL & RELATIONAL APPROACH

Course Instructor: Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D.

The treatment of substance abuse, be it alcohol or drugs, presents clinicians with patients who are psychotherapeutically difficult to reach and who create unique transference/countertransference patterns. Case material will be used to explore the interplay between attending directly to the addiction and disengaging from the pull to do so between therapist and patient. The emphasis in treatment is on how relational interactions contribute to and maintain addictive patterns. Using a multiple states dissociative model, this class will focus on various treatment issues and concerns including: how the addiction functions as an attempt to repair, the myths of addiction, affect regulation, and the concepts of mindfulness, helplessness and powerlessness.


WEEK 26 April 16th

THE CONVERGENCE OF HARM REDUCTION THERAPY AND RELATIONAL PSYCHOANALYSIS IN TREATING SUBSTANCE MISUSE

Course Instructor: Debra Rothschild, Ph.D.

Harm Reduction Therapy is a form of treating substance misuse that expands the traditional "disease concept" model to one that allows for an individualized approach based on the needs of each patient. Harm Reduction Therapy aims to reduce any harm or risk that substance use may impose on the user or on others, and its practice is collaborative and emphasizes respect for the individual and treatment of a whole person in context. In this respect, it differs from the traditional treatment of alcoholism or substance abuse that has focused on the elimination of misuse or addiction. We will introduce and review psychoanalytic theories specifically relevant to the treatment of substance misuse and show how they dovetail with Harm Reduction therapy. Clinical material will be used to demonstrate an integrated approach to treatment based on the converging principles of Harm Reduction and Relational Psychoanalysis.


WEEK 27 April 23rd

INTEGRATING 12-STEP PROGRAMS INTO A PSYCHOANALYTIC THERAPY

Course Instructor: Gayle Lewis Ph.D., MSCS

The use of adjunct modalities in the treatment of addictions is often essential to the recovery process. This course will explore the 12-step model and offer a conceptual approach to usefully think about its strengths and weaknesses.  A case that includes Overeaters Anonymous will be presented in order to discuss the specifics of an integrated treatment.


WEEK 28 April 30th

WORKING WITH WEED: TREATMENT IMPLICATIONS OF CANNABIS USE AMIDST CULTURAL AND LEGAL SHIFTS

Course Instructor: Steven Tublin, Ph.D.

The use of adjunct modalities in the treatment of addictions is often essential to the

recovery process. This course will explore the 12-step model and discuss its approaches

and philosophies for addressing addictions, while also making some comparisons and

contradictions to the ways psychoanalytic treatment approaches the same. One (perhaps

two if time permits) cases will be presented in order to discuss the specifics of integrating

the two treatment processes.


WEEK 29 May 7th

TREATING ADDICTION IN THE ADOLESCENT AND COLLEGE STUDENT

Course Instructors: Patricia Bellucci, Ph.D. & Michelle Kennedy, LCSW.

This course will address questions of use and abuse of drugs and alcohol among young adults and adolescents. Developmental conflicts, self-medication, and the social context in which this population functions --i.e., school, peer group, family-- will be discussed. The use of consultation, transference, countertransference, and referral to adjunct treatments will be considered.


WEEK 30 May 14th

THE INTERFACE OF SPIRITUALITY, PSYCHOANALYSIS AND ADDICTION IN WORKING WITH PATIENTS IN RECOVERY

Course Instructor: Ann B. Chanler, Ph.D.

This class will focus on the interface of spirituality, with particular attention paid to mindfulness and psychoanalysis when working with patients in recovery. We will consider the value of loving kindness while peeling away the layers of deeply embedded feelings of inadequacy, pain and anger. Spirituality helps addicts connect to suffering with compassion. Like psychoanalysis, it encourages reflection and non-judgmental self-awareness. It creates an internal spaciousness through non-reaction and helps build self-respect. Both inspire a generosity towards self, self-confidence and a positive self-identity. Discussion of how the interpretation of events-- not the events themselves-- that cause distress will be explored.


WEEK 30 EVENING May 14th  FRIDAY 6:00 - 8:00pm

SPECIAL EVENING EVENT

DISSOCIATIVE IDENTITY DISORDER: THE REAL MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR

PRESENTER: Sheldon Itzkowitz, Ph.D.

In practice, clinicians can miss the subtle state changes that accompany dissociation. Patients at the extreme end of the continuum of dissociative disorders can help us understand pathological dissociation as a means of maintaining rigid boundaries around self-states for the purpose of emotional survival. Traumatic dissociation results when the normal process of dissociation becomes rigidified and the child's mind becomes structuralized in such a way that the developing sense of "me-ness" or "I" that leads us all to feel as if our minds are singular, unitary, and bounded, is derailed. The result is, depending on the level and intensity of trauma and dissociation, the emergence of multiple centers of experience or self-states.

Dr. Itzkowitz will present a series of video clips of his work with patients who suffer from DID to show how shifts in self states occur.   He will demonstrate how he engages these states and uses his experience intersubjectively to help patients loosen their defensive reliance on dissociation.

 

WEEK 31 May 21st

COUPLES UNCONSCIOUS COLLUSION IN COMPULSIONS

Course Instructor: Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D.

Birds of a feather flock together and opposites attract. Clinical couples often present with a similarity of underlying fears and a complementarity of styles in dealing with those fears. Thus, in some clinical couples, addictions or eating disorders present in one partner are consistent with attributes that initially attracted that partner to the other because of shared unresolved dilemmas. They have fundamentally similar issues which they have coped with in opposite styles. The complaints about the disorder are, therefore, not only telling about the partner who has them, but also about unresolved issues in the mate. Participants in this class will use this understanding to gain leverage in helping the couple change.


WEEK 32 June 4th

ELUSIVE LOVE IN LOVE AND FANTASY

PART ONE: SEARCHING FOR LOVE FROM THE OUTSIDE IN

Course Instructor: Sivan Baron, J.D., LCSW

Part one will explore the ways in which patients with eating disorders, compulsions and addiction are in "relationship" with their object of abuse/addiction. We will also look at the way that fantasies about romantic love/partnership operate as solutions to conscious and unconscious depressive anxieties.  In fantasy, the romantic partner becomes the object that magically delivers happiness, wholeness and even thinness. Case material will be presented for discussion.

 

PART TWO: IN LOVE AND FANTASY

Course Instructor: Evelyn Hartman, Ph.D.

This course will examine addictions and obsessions with different types of fantasies of love, whether actualized or not, that impede having fulfilling love relationships. The focus will be on understanding the factors that contribute to creating these fantasies as well as the power that sustains them.


WEEK 33 June 11th

ENSLAVED BY DESIRE: RELATIONSHIP ADDICTION

Course Instructor: Jill Howard, Ph.D.

This course will use Fairbairn’s theory of the exciting-rejecting object as a way to think about addictive relationships. We will consider this theory as one explanation for people being unable to sustain long-term monogamous relationships. This issue will be explored, through readings and case material, as a dynamic that helps explain the difficulty we see with patients getting married and with people having extra-marital affairs.



WEEK 34 June 18th

THE MINDBRAIN AND DREAMS

Course Instructor: Mark Blechner, Ph.D.

This class argues that the mind and brain should be understood as a single unit – the "mindbrain" – which manipulates our raw perceptions of the world and reshapes that world through dreams, thoughts, and artistic creation. You will explore how dreams are key to understanding mental processes, and how working with dreams clinically with individuals and groups provides an essential route towards achieving transformation within the psychoanalytic process. Covering such key topics as knowledge, emotion, metaphor, and memory, this class sets out a radical new agenda for understanding the importance of dreams in human thought and their clinical importance in psychoanalysis. Blechner draws on the latest neuroscientific findings to set out a new way of how the mindbrain constructs reality, and provides guidance on how best to help clinicians understand their patients as well as their own dreams.



WEEK 35 June 25th

CASE PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION BY CANDIDATES

Course Instructors: Discussion by EDCAS Faculty members and class participants

Time: 200-4:00pm followed by

GRADUATION CEREMONY FRIDAY EVENING 4:00-5:00pm

 

 

Special Highlights for Program Participants


NETWORKING DINNER

 

The faculty organizes a Networking Dinner that provides students and faculty a chance to talk informally and get to know each other. This creates opportunities for personal and professional connections, and each year that we do it, much fun is had by all. The fee for this dinner is covered in the cost of your tuition. This event will be held at The Institute of Culinary Education, 225 Liberty St., NYC on the evening of Friday, November 20th from 6-9:30pm. We will be cooking our own meal together as a group.

 

DIRECTORY

 

We will supply every student with a Directory book for all of the program participants and faculty. In addition to your name and contact information, your listing will include a one or two paragraph description of your background, your areas of specialization and interest, and patient populations with whom you work.  It will also list whether you are part of any managed care panels and if you have a sliding scale fee. We have found this to be tremendously helpful for making referrals and building one’s practice.


JOURNAL SUBSCRIPTION

 

We also offer a one-year online complimentary subscription to the journal Contemporary Psychoanalysis.

 

-----------------

 

DIRECTOR and FOUNDER, EDCAS

Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D.

 

EDCAS STEERING COMMITTEE

Jacqueline Ferraro, D.M.H.; Carrie Gottlieb, Ph.D.; Elizabeth Halsted, Ph.D.; Jill Howard, Ph.D.; Gayle Lewis, Ph.D., MSCS; Stephanie Roth-Goldberg, LCSW; Sarah Schoen, Ph.D.; Janet Tintner, Psy.D.


FACULTY & SUPERVISORY CONSULTANTS

Toni Andrews, Ph.D.

Sivan Baron, J.D., LCSW

Patricia Bellucci, Ph.D.

Mark Blechner, Ph.D.

Phillip Blumberg, Ph.D.

Judith Brisman, Ph.D.

Sandra Buechler, Ph.D.

Ann Chanler, Ph.D.

A. Mittsi Crossman, MD

Eugenio Duarte, Ph.D.

Todd Essig, Ph.D.

Jacqueline Ferraro, D.M.H.

Richard B. Gartner, Ph.D.

Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D.

*Caryn Gorden, Psy.D.

*Carrie Gottlieb, Ph.D.

Elizabeth Halsted, Ph.D.

Anton Hart, Ph.D.

Evelyn Hartman, Ph.D.

Jill Howard, Ph.D.

Melanie Israelovitch, M.D.

*Sheldon Itzkowitz, Ph.D.

*Michelle Kennedy, LCSW

Sharon Kofman, Ph.D.

Sue Kolod, Ph.D.

*Gayle Lewis, Ph.D. MSCS

*Rosa Lim, Ph.D.

Jean Petrucelli, Ph.D.

Stephanie Roth-Goldberg, LCSW

*Debra Rothschild, Ph.D.
Sarah Schoen, Ph.D.

Janet Tintner, Psy.D.

Steven Tublin, Ph.D.

*Guest Faculty


This program is approved for 70 Continuing Education Contact Hours, (CE, CME credits) for Psychologists, Physicians, and Social Workers. Credits are calculated on a credit per our basis.


For Psychologists: The William Alanson White Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for Psychologists. The William Alanson White Institute maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents.

 

For Social Workers: William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentʹs State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0159.

 

For Licensed Psychoanalysts: William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentʹs State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0007.

 

For Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the William Alanson White Institute. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of [70] AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

 

For Mental Health Counselors: William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentʹs State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for Licensed Mental Health Counselors. #MHC-0025

 

For Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists: William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentʹs State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0019.

 

For Licensed Creative Arts Therapists: William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Departmentʹs State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed creative arts therapists. #CAT-0011.

 

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

 

Continuing Education Credits: CE credits are calculated on a credit per course hour basis.


The William Alanson White Institute is a SEVIS approved school.

 

-----------------


EDCAS 2020-2021 CALENDAR for TUESDAY 10:00 CONFERENCES

 

These conferences are open to all EDCAS students—past and current –

in addition to members of the White Institute.

It is not mandatory to attend….just icing on the cake.


TIME: 10:00 – 11:30am

PLACE: The William Alanson White Institute, Rm 3A

DATE: Tuesday, October 6th, 2020

TITLE: Eating Through Change: Links Between Eating Disorders and Life Transitions PRESENTER:  Diane Barth, LCSW.

 

******************

 

TIME: 10:00 – 11:30am

PLACE: The William Alanson White Institute, Rm 3A

DATE: Tuesday, December 1st, 2020

TITLE: It Takes A Village: Eating Disorders & the Multipersonal Field

PRESENTER: Danielle Novack, Ph.D.


*******************

 

TIME: 10:00 – 11:30am

PLACE: The William Alanson White Institute, Rm 3A

DATE: Tuesday, March 2nd, 2021

TITLE: Separation from the Self, Connection to the World:  The Promises and Risks of Hallucinogens

PRESENTER: Josh Bazell, MD.


*******************

 

TIME: 10:00 – 11:30am

PLACE: The William Alanson White Institute, Rm 3A

DATE: Tuesday, May 4th, 2021

TITLE: The Relationality of Skin: Mind, Body, and the Experience of the Self

PRESENTER: Karen Perlman, Ph.D.