The Couples Therapy Training and Education Program (CTTEP)

Training & Education » The Couples Therapy Training and Education Program (CTTEP)

 

 

The Couples Therapy Training and Education Program (CTTEP)

 

Starts in September 2018

 

The Program

 

We are pleased once again to offer the Couples Therapy Training and Education Program (CTTEP) at the White Institute this upcoming academic year.  CTTEP starts in September, 2018 as a thirty-week (one year) certificate program that follows the White Institute calendar. The program has as its mission to educate and train mental health professionals in psychoanalytic-systemic couples therapy.  CTTEP emphasizes Interpersonal Psychoanalytic-Systemic Couples Therapy, but the training includes additional psychoanalytic-systemic points of view.  Our approach both in our theory of technique, and our practical guidance about intervening is defined by integrating core psychoanalytic constructs with constructs that define systems work.  For example, we integrate the inevitability and usefulness of transference/countertransference phenomena and the enactment in the therapy of the therapeutic issues with the interlocking co-construction of couples' problems, triangulation and the intergenerational transmission of unresolved issues that constrain couples' interactional experiences and choices.

 

There are three components to the program, which must all be taken: didactics, group case conferences, and off-site one to one case consultation.  Trainees must complete 30 consultation hours with their given case consultant. Of these 30 hours, a minimum of 20 must address the candidate’s clinical work with one or more current and active couples.  One-and-a-half hour classes followed by one-hour case seminars will take place on Fridays from 12:15–3 at the Institute (20 West 74th Street).  The time for the required once weekly off-site case consultation will be agreed upon between the trainee and the consultant.  The cost of the program is $2750.00 plus a weekly fee paid directly to the consultant of $60 a session. Additionally, there is a non-refundable application processing fee of $75.00.  Applicants must be licensed (or provisionally licensed by limited permit) to practice therapy in their respective fields, and must submit with the application a copy of their current license, their current registration, and their current professional liability insurance.

 

Over the course of thirty weeks, didactic modules will address how to begin/sustain a treatment; couples dynamics expressed in classical and popular art; class and race issues in couples; sex; LGBTQ partners; parenting; and strategies with high conflict couples, among other topics.

 

The three consecutive ten-week case conferences, led by three different faculty members, offer case consultation to each trainee in turn with all students present.  Each student will have presented a case for two weeks by the end of the three group case conferences. One-to-one off-site case consultation takes place in the consultant’s office for thirty weeks.

 

Applications

 

***** Applications for CTTEP are available now ******

register today

 

 

 

Applicants must be authorized to practice in their respective field and must have a couple in their practice or anticipate having a couple by October 2018.  Prospective trainees will be interviewed after the CTTEP Executive Committee receives the application, two letters of recommendation, the scanned copy of the license or other documentation legally authorizing trainees to work with couples independently in private practice or clinic settings, the scanned copy of the up-to-date registration, and the up-to-date professional liability insurance of the applicants, as well as the processing fee.  We strongly encourage each applicant to have engaged in or to be engaged in his/her/their own therapy/analysis as we believe it enhances and complements overall growth in the program. While our usual deadline of June 30th, 2018 has already passed, we will continue to consider applications throughout the summer until our 2018-2019 class is filled.

 

We thank you very much for your interest and welcome hearing from you. If you have questions not answered by the above description, you may inquire of any of the executive committee of the couples program, which consists of the following members:

 


 


Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D.,        Director sgoldklank@gmail.com

Ethan Graham, Ph.D.,           Co-director  ethanagraham@gmail.com

Lawrence O. Brown, Ph.D.,   Consultant   dr.lb@wawhite.org

 

View the Curriculum and Faculty

 

 

Couples Therapy Training and Education Program, (CTTEP) Learning Objectives

 

 

Weeks One - Seven

How to Keep Your Head When They’re Losing Theirs: Getting Treatment Started

and Sustained

Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D.


1: After the first class, students will be able to list at least three constructs from psychoanalysis and three from systems therapy that are integrated in the orientation of this program and apply them to a case which they are diagnosing.

2: After the second class, students will be able to take a genogram, getting information about the family of origin of each member of the couple in such a way that the information anticipates transference/countertransference issues relevant to the presenting complaint.

3: After the third class, students should be able to diagnose three crucial components of couple functioning that are in question for their couples case.

4: After the fourth class, students should be able to intervene in a commitment difficulty in a couple.

5: After the fifth class, students should be able to intervene in a power or an intimacy difficulty and spot the difference between a commitment issue and an intimacy issue.

6: After the sixth class, students should be able to spot and understand what to do when they are siding, unconsciously at first and collusively with the system, with one person in a couple over another.

7: After the seventh class, students should be able to present their couples cases giving the most relevant couples issues, rather than individual issues, that is, the students should begin to speak systemically as well speaking  their more familiar psychoanalytic language and conceptualization. Their descriptions should not only include complementarity and similarity, but also life cycle stage, triangulations, and horizontal manifestations of vertical (family of origin) unresolved issues.

 

Weeks 8-9

Couples Dynamics as Expressed in Classical and Popular Art

Richard Fulmer, Ph.D.

 

1: Demonstrate in a case how the variables of membership, power and affection interact as a three-generational family goes through the phase of emerging adulthood.

2: Show in a case how the pressures on the blending of identities and the preservation of individuality interact in the formation of a couple.


Weeks 10-12

Talking About Sex in Couples Therapy

Shoshana Bulow, Ph.D.

 

1: After the first class, students will be able to identify and analyze issues that prevent therapists from speaking about sexual matters in couples therapy and describe why it is critical to do so. They will also be able to demonstrate at least three strategies for overcoming those barriers.

2: After the second class, students will be able to describe at least 3 common sexual dysfunctions.

3. After the third class, students will demonstrate their ability to integrate and apply learned treatment strategies to address sexual complaints.

 

Clinical Case Conference Learning Objectives:


1: Students will learn to use the information from the didactic course to increase their professional competence.
2: Students will learn how couples therapy compares with work with individuals.
3: Students will learn techniques for establishing trusting relationships between therapists and couples.
4: Students will be able to take a genogram for their patients and use it in such a way that the information anticipates transference/countertransference.
5: Students will be able to demonstrate in a case how the variables of membership, power and affection interact as a three-generational family goes through the phase of emerging adulthood.
6: Students will be able to explore how they can deal with the problem of favoring one person in a couple over another in their own treatment cases.
7: Students will learn how to present a couples therapy case giving the most relevant couples issues in order to obtain group input into their clinical work.
8: Students will be able to give positive feedback to each other when presenting clinical material.