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Summer Educational Intensive

Date: June 18, 2018 9:30am to June 22, 2018 12:30pm
Details:

Master Clinicians Of The William Alanson White Institute

 

The William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis & Psychology's Center for Applied Psychoanalysis Presents a 5 Day Summer Educational Intensive.


June 18-22, 2018 | 9:30 AM – 12:30 PM Daily


register today

 

Five Master Clinicians offer five unique vantage points in working psychoanalytically from a contemporary Interpersonal/Relational perspective. Using live supervision and group discussion, expert clinicians will illustrate their techniques in how they think about clinical process. A weeklong program, participants will have the opportunity to spend three intensive hours each morning, observing the methods used by masters in the field, and participating in daily Q&A’s. Afternoons are free for students to explore New York City or to return to their work settings.

 

Program Schedule

Monday, June 18         Todd Essig, Ph.D.

Tuesday, June 19         Evelyn Hartman, Ph.D.

Wednesday, June 20   Darlene Ehrenberg, Ph.D.

Thursday, June 21       Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D.

Friday, June 22            Edgar Levenson, M.D. with Alan Slomowitz, Ph.D.

 

Registration

REGISTER NOW! Early registration pricing has been extended:

Professionals: $500

Candidates & students: $250

15 CE/CME Credits are available for this program

 

Refunds available up to June 8, 2018


 

register today

 

 

 

Target Audience: Psychologists, Physicians, Social Workers and Licensed Psychoanalysts. This program is planned for all levels of experience.

 

Six Master Clinicians offer unique vantage points in working psychoanalytically from a contemporary Interpersonal/Relational perspective. Using live supervision and group discussion, expert clinicians will illustrate their techniques in how they think about clinical process. A weeklong program, participants will have the opportunity to spend three intensive hours each morning, observing the methods used by masters in the field, and participating in daily Q&A’s. Afternoons are free for students to explore New York City or to return to their work settings.

 

PROGRAM SCHEDULE

Monday, June 18

Todd Essig, Ph.D.

Title: Getting Close To Distance Treatment: Whether And How To Provide Screen Relations Based Psychoanalytic Care

 

Description: Technologically-mediated relationships are now everywhere, including in the consulting room. These new practices raise numerous questions too frequently ignored: How does treatment take off when people aren’t, and may never be, in the same location? Can such distance treatments even work? And if they do, are they helpful in the same way, i.e., do technologically-mediated psychoanalytic processes work similarly to those which operate when people are bodies together? Or, are the interpersonal fields in the two contexts fundamentally different? And, if they are fundamentally different, how can clinicians apply what is known from physically co-present treatment, to the new situation of screen relations based treatment? This section will answer these questions from the perspective of Interpersonal psychoanalysis.

 

Todd Essig, Ph.D. is a Training and Supervising Psychoanalyst at the William Alanson White Institute and Faculty in the Adult Certificate Program in Psychoanalysis. He's served on the editorial boards for Contemporary Psychoanalysis and the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association and recently co-edited (along with Gillian Isaacs Russell) a special issue of Psychoanalytic Perspectives on technology. For 16 years, until 2009, he was Director and Founder of The Psychoanalytic Connection (psychoanalysis.net), becoming widely known among colleagues as a pioneer in the innovative uses of information technologies for mental health professionals. He currently writes "Managing Mental Wealth" for Forbes where he writes about building an authentically good life in emerging techno-culture. His clinical practice is in New York City where he treats individuals and couples, almost all of whom come to his office.

 

At the end of this session, students will be able to:

1. list two dimensions of difference between physically co-present interpersonal fields and technologically-mediated interpersonal fields;

2. list 5 reasons why a treatment or session might be conducted at a distance.

3. explain two perils when providing psychoanalytic care at a distance.

 

Tueday, June 19

Title: Working with Dreams Along the Royal Road

Evelyn Hartman, Ph.D.

 

Description and Learning Objectives:

“Dreams are the royal road into the unconscious” and are often fascinating as well as mystifying. Patients bring dreams into treatment, which are meaningful and revealing. How one understands dreams varies and it is challenging to develop technique in working with patient’s dreams.

 

Evelyn Berger Hartman is Training and Supervising Analyst and faculty, William Alanson White Institute. She is a faculty member of the Institute of Contemporary Psychotherapy, and Manhattan Institute of Psychoanalysis, and is an Editorial Board member of Contemporary Psychoanalysis. She teaches and writes about Freud, dreams, and the psychodynamics of love.

 

At the conclusion of this class students will be able to:

 

1. describe the historical psychoanalytic ideas about the formation of dreams and the way they have been modified by psychoanalytic and neurobiological studies.

2. list two different ways of understanding and working with dreams in clinical treatment.

3. illustrate two principles of group dream interpretation with clinical examples.

 

 

Wednesday, June 20

Title: Working at the Intimate Edge

Darlene Bregman Ehrenberg, Ph.D., ABPP

Dr. Ehrenberg's premise is that becoming more attuned to the interactive nature of the analytic field has profound implications for what is healing in the psychoanalytic interaction. Using clinical case examples, Dr. Ehrenberg will stress the importance of attending to the affective relationship and the role of unconscious communication and enactment in the analytic interaction.  This illustrates the rich rewards of working at the “ intimate edge”.  Attending to the dialectical relationship between the interpersonal and intrapsychic can enable psychoanalysts to refine their theory and ability to use themselves as analytic instruments.

 

Darlene Bregman Ehrenberg, Ph.D., ABPP, Author, The Intimate Edge: Extending The Reach Of Psychoanalytic Interaction (W.W. Norton and Company, Inc., 1992); Training & Supervising Analyst, Faculty, W.A. White Institute; Supervising Analyst, Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, at NYU Postdoctoral Program; Faculty, Mitchell Center for Psychoanalysis; Editorial Board of Contemporary Psychoanalysis, Associate Editor, Psychoanalytic Dialogues, Consulting Editor, Psychoanalytic Inquiry. She lectures around the world and is currently working on two new books, one on intergenerational transmission of trauma, and the other focusing on issues of desire and therapeutic action.

 

 

 

At the end of this session, students will be able to:

  1. apply the approach of focusing on Transference dynamics and Countertransference to understanding how and why treatment impasses and stalemates occur.
  2. explain the Transference and Countertransference dynamics during supervision of psychoanalysis and psychoanalytic psychotherapy.
  3. list key elements that characterize Interpersonal/Relational psychoanalytic theory and technique.

 

 

Thursday, June 21

Title: Unconscious Coupling: Interpersonal Psychoanalytic Couples Therapy

Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D.

Dr. Goldklank’s work with couples emphasizes Interpersonal Psychoanalytic-Systemic Couples Therapy, and includes additional psychoanalytic-systemic points of view.  The approach both in theory of technique and practical guidance about intervening is defined by integrating core psychoanalytic constructs with constructs that define systems work.  For example, we integrate the inevitability and usefulness of transference/countertransference phenomena and the enactment in the therapy of the therapeutic issues with the interlocking co-construction of couples' problems, triangulation and the intergenerational transmission of unresolved issues that constrain couples' interactional experiences and choices.  Case Presentation by Claudia Borrell L.C.S.W.

 

 

Shelly Goldklank, Ph.D. is the Founding Director of the Couples Therapy Training and Education Program at the William Alanson White Institute where she is also Teaching and Supervising Faculty,; Director of the Psychodynamic Track and Associate Professor, Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University; and a founding member of Section VIII, Division 39, APA (Couple and Family Therapy and Psychoanalysis). Dr. Goldklank has been treating individuals, couples, and families for four decades and teaching, writing, and speaking about psychoanalytic/systemic couple and family therapy for thirty years.

 

Claudia Borrell, L.C.S.W., has a psychotherapy practice treating individuals and couples in Rockville Centre, on the South Shore of Long Island. She received her masters degree in social work at Columbia University. She worked for many years in both women’s health and substance abuse settings, providing psychotherapy and supervision, as well as NIDA funded research. She completed the Intensive Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy Program as well as the Couples Therapy Training and Education Program, both at the William Alanson White Institute. She is particularly interested in providing an interpersonal psychoanalytic treatment approach to a socially and economically diverse population.

 

At the end of the session, students will be able to:

  1. describe the importance of and explain ways to assess how both partners in a couple co-construct the problem between them.
  2. create a genogram that links the co-constructed problems to both partners' family histories.
  3. discuss the unconscious contract between the partners as self - and as other - protection.

 

Friday, June 22:

Edgar Levenson, M.D. and Alan Slomowitz, Ph.D.

Title: Conversation with Ed Levenson

 

For more than 50 years, Edgar Levenson has been a key figure in the development of Interpersonal psychoanalysis.  His seminal writing has included works on theoretical topics such as models of psychoanalysis, Harry Stack Sullivan’s theories, and the nature of change, as well as his more familiar focus on practical analytic topics such as transference, supervision, and the use of the self in psychoanalytic clinical work. This session will give the participant the special opportunity to participate in a conversation between Dr. Levenson and Alan Slomowitz, editor of The Purloined Self and to observe Edgar’s supervisory skill.

 

Edgar A. Levenson, M.D., is Supervising and Training analyst, and Fellow Emeritus at the White Institute, and Adjunct Clinical Professor of Psychology at NYU’s Postdoctoral Program.  A celebrated psychoanalyst and an original and creative mind, his ideas are largely responsible for our awareness of the profound influence that patient and analyst exert upon one another.  Among Dr. Levenson’s numerous articles and books are The Fallacy of Understanding (1979), The Ambiguity of Change: An Inquiry into the Nature of Psychodynamic Reality(1983), and The Purloined Self: Interpersonal Perspectives in Psychoanalysis (1991). In addition to his seminal publications, Dr. Levenson is also the recipient of the coveted Signorney Award, honoring his contribution to psychoanalytic theory and praxis across schools and continents.

 

Alan Slomowitz, Ph.D. (discussant for Dr. Levenson) is a graduate of the White Institute, where he is Supervisor of Psychotherapy, and on the faculty of several postgraduate programs. He is also the editor of Edgar Levenson’s recently published volume, The Purloined Self: Interpersonal Perspective in Psychoanalysis. Dr. Slomowitz has been instrumental in starting a psychoanalytically informed dialogue regarding LGBTQ people.

 

At the end of this session, students will be able to:

  1. discuss the inevitability of the analyst's participation in the process;
  2. describe how a session’s dialogue and interactions are enacted between the analyst and patient;
  3. discuss the importance of detailed inquiry in deconstructing the patient's narrative for therapeutic use.

Continuing Education Information:

For Psychologists:

 

The William Alanson White Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor Continuing Education for Psychologists. The William Alanson White Institute maintains responsibility for these programs and their contents.

 

For Social Workers:

William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #SW-0159.

 

For Licensed Psychoanalysts:

 

William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed psychoanalysts. #P-0007.



For Mental Health Counselors:

 

William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for Licensed Mental Health Counselors. #MHC-0025

 

 

For Licensed Marriage and Family Therapists:

 

William Alanson White Institute of Psychiatry, Psychoanalysis and Psychology is recognized by the New York State Education Department's State Board for Mental Health Practitioners as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed marriage and family therapists. #MFT-0019.

 

 

IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose.

 

Continuing Education Credits:

 

CE credits are calculated on a credit per course hour basis.