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Why Behaviorists Are Right (And Why I am Not a Behaviorist): Toward an Integrative Model of Child and Adolescent Therapy

Date: Apr 26, 2017 8:00 pm
Details:

OPEN HOUSE

CHILD & ADOLESCENT PSYCOTHERAPY TRAINING PROGRAM

The Frieda Fromm-Reichmann Graduate Society of The Child & Adolescent Psychotherapy Training Program

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Wednesday, April 26, 2017

8:00 pm to 9:30 pm

 

Why Behaviorists Are Right (And Why I am Not a Behaviorist):

Toward an Integrative Model of Child and Adolescent Therapy

Kenneth Barish, Ph.D.

 

Effective therapeutic work with children and adolescents is necessarily eclectic. None of our existing theoretical models – humanistic, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral or family systems – are, by themselves, adequate to understand and successfully treat the diversity of clinical problems presented to us on a daily basis.

 

In this talk, I will present an integrative theory of healthy and pathological development in childhood and an inclusive model of therapeutic change.  I will attempt to show, with case examples, how we can retain the essential contributions of humanistic and psychoanalytic theory – enduring ideas that are helpful to all children and families - and also make constructive use of recently developed cognitive and behavioral techniques.

 

Kenneth Barish, Ph.D. is on the faculty of William Alanson White Institute Child and Adolescent Psychotherapy Training Program and the Westchester Center for the Study of Psychoanalysis and Psychotherapy. He is also Clinical Professor of Psychology at Weill Medical College, Cornell University.  Dr. Barish is the author of Pride and Joy: A Guide to Understanding Your Child’s Emotions and Solving Family Problems (Oxford University Press, 2012).

 

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Refreshments to Follow

 

Register Here

 

 

 

VIEWS FROM THE PLAYSPACE LECTURE SERIES

This is an invitation to explore and consider the many ways of thinking about the treatment of children, adolescents and their families.  How do we understand the person before us?  What is helpful in the short-term?  What produces lasting and meaningful change?  We will consider developmental, neuroscientific, and psychoanalytic approaches to understanding the meaning of symptomatic behaviors.

 

 

Upcoming Talks

 

5/24/17         Michael Garrett, Ph.D.

TBA

6/05/17            Constance Katz, Ph.D.

Pillars of my work in the Psychotherapy of Children and Adolescents